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Microsites: When A Little Is Enough

When A Little Is Enough

The term “microsite” gets tossed around a whole lot in the web world, and there’s certainly a lot of different ways that everyone will interpret what the term actually means. Without getting too carried away, a microsite is a page or collection of pages used to promote specific brands or services in a targeted and focused way. It can typically be part of your site (your-domain.com/microsite), a sub-domain of your site (microsite.your-domain.com), or some other domain name (your-service.com). How you set it up is entirely up to you, but with a little planning and foresight, microsites can really step up and deliver a big message for your business!

Small Thing With a Big Message

Often, a microsite will exist as a sub-page of a parent company website. For example, if you own a cleaning company you may offer services such as closet or garage organization, in addition to standard in-home cleaning. So while the key messaging of your main website may be your in-home cleaning services, you could create a microsite specifically for closet organization. This would allow you to focus on a single brand or service, and target not only the messaging on the microsite, but the analytics and SEO, as well. Having this separate microsite for your garage organization service would allow you to focus any Adwords or pay- per-click efforts you want to put in play directly to the microsite (often called a landing page), where the information visitors will find is focused and on point.

Every Little Bit Helps

And while this may sound like a simple enough thing to do, getting it right can be tricky at times. You should work with your web or marketing team to figure out what is the best way to set up your microsite, and don’t forget the management side of things, too. Also, you’ll need to focus on the content. It’s a bad idea to just copy and paste hunks of your main site into your microsite – in fact, Google will be able to tell, and will probably skew your rankings if you do. The content for your microsite SHOULD be specific to the need – the service or product, and should serve to support it completely.

With some focus and planning, a little can go a long way to helping out your bottom line!

About The Author

Edd Twilbeck
Edd Twilbeck is Senior Web Developer at Marketing In Color. Websites and web applications are Edd’s realm, so he takes the lead on web projects from scope layout through specification and timeline development to completion and delivery. Edd has more than twelve years experience in web design and development, using PHP, CSS, Javascript, content management systems, and development frameworks.
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